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YBI Creative

Rob Sharp – Interview Summary

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Recently I had a very interesting chat with Rob Sharp from YBI Creative. The interview is divided into two parts:

But for all you time-poor sponsorship seekers I have summarised the interview below…

5 common mistakes sponsorship seekers make:

  1. Poor spelling – have your sponsorship proposal proof read by someone other than yourself.
  2. Sending the sponsorship proposal to the wrong person – make sure you have established a relationship with the person who can say yes.
  3. Sending a sponsorship proposal before making a meaningful connection.
  4. Not abiding by their sponsorship and brand guidelines – use the right logos and colours etc.
  5. Not finding out why you were unsuccessful – use this as an opportunity to improve your sponsorship seeking skills.

3 golden rules for a successful sponsorship:

  1. Never give up – keep learning and trying and you will succeed.
  2. Make a strong marketing case.
  3. Communicate with your sponsor meaningfully and regularly.

Key Points:

  • Research. Research. Research.
  • Start with a verbal. People respond better to someone that they feel they know already.
  • Establishing who you should be talking too immediately.
  • Have a unique selling proposition / define your angle.
  • Establish a connection with the potential sponsor’s brand.
  • How do you fit with their existing marketing strategy?
  • Understand the potential sponsor’s message.
  • Turning the intangible into the tangible – make sure you can track exposure.
  • Sponsorship is a risk…the sponsor can get quantifiable results from other marketing opportunities.
  • Unique experiences are the key.
  • What are the sponsor’s key performance indicators (KPIs) – address them directly.
  • Make the sponsor feel comfortable that they won’t get egg on their faces – make it as easy as possible to sell the opportunity internally.
  • Time your proposals with the sponsor’s planning and decision making process.
  • Place the emphasis on value, not on costs.
  • Put in place strategies to quantify results.
  • Don’t talk numbers until you have established a relationship.
  • Provide indicative investment requirements at the right time.
  • Understand that the sponsor has to leverage or activate the opportunity. And this can require an investment of 3 to 5 times what they are investing with you.
  • Package your proposal in a way that best communicates with the potential sponsor.
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