Welcome to Practical Sponsorship Ideas
Sponsor Pitch

What’s the one thing sponsorship seekers have too little of (apart from money)?

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It’s not passion and it’s not motivation.

It’s time; time to find and research sponsors, time to prepare sponsorship proposals and time to create unique marketing opportunities.

As a sponsorship seeker you can spend a heap of time finding and researching potential sponsors, creating spreadsheets, recording contact details and analysing the data.

I know from personal experience that sponsorship research can take days and days of your time. Research is a necessary step in the process of preparing and delivering targeted sponsorship proposals that have the best chance of success.

So what are the alternatives? Can we save time and reach better qualified leads?

Online sponsorship research tools

With the world slowly but surely becoming app-a-fied (I think I just made that up) it comes as no surprise that some smart and enterprising folk have also applied this thinking to sponsorship seeking.

One such service is sponsorpitch.com, an online business founded in 2008 that currently boast about 10,000 users.

Kris Mathis, CEO of sponsorpitch.com explains… “Our goal is to help you find the right partners and have the right conversations at the right time. We aim to help sellers find the top brands who are right for them that make the most sense based on historical spending patterns, where brands spend and what they spend on.”

Kris is also quick to point out “We’re not trying to broker the deal for you. We’re proving the historical data and market intelligence so you can create valuable connections with sponsors. The core questions we want to answer are what buyers want, which brands you should be talking to and who within that brand you should be talking to.”

The role of services like sponsorspitch.com

Knowledge is power as they say. And this is what Kris and the team at sponsorpitch.com are endeavouring to provide; an online service that incorporates up-to-date sponsorship information (who’s doing what with whom and how) with tools to search, research and connect with potential buyers and sellers.

According to Kris, the primary goals are to:

  • Grow the sponsorship market place, connecting more buyers with more sellers
  • Aggregate the wealth of sponsorship information out there to free up your time so members can do what they do best – create proposals, implement deals and measure deals and provide value to sponsors
  • Level the playing field to allow everyone access to sponsorship data and market intelligence which has until recently been the domain of industry heavyweights
  • Cater to the needs of the local street fair and all the way up to million dollar opportunities
  • Help people understand what sponsorship is and isn’t by providing educational information and insights
  • Create an environment where members can collaborate amongst each other
  • Provide the network and market intelligence so buyers and sellers can leverage the data to create solution-based sponsorship connections

How it works

I created a free membership account on the system and had a play. But to get the most out of it you’re going to need a full membership which currently costs $25 per month. A relatively small fee when you consider the time you’ll potentially save and the connections you’ll make.

Sponsorspitch.com is also North American centric. Understandable considering the organisation is located in New York. However, from what I hear the membership and opportunities are beginning to extend into Europe and Asia.

The two things that I found most appealing were the networking opportunities with other members and ability to see what types of organisations are investing in my niche.

With a paid membership you have access to the contact details of thousands of sponsorship buyers and sellers, what deals they’ve done and which organisations they’re associated with – basically social networking for the sponsorship industry.

However, the main draw card of the system is the data, and your ability to search and sort through this data to find targeted opportunities that best fit what you have to offer.
For example, using the Sponsors Filter option I was able to get a list of 15 Food and Beverage brands that had invested in Auto Racing sponsorship and are head quartered in Texas. Living in Australia, this information isn’t directly applicable, but what it does tell me is the sorts of brands I should be approaching and the types of opportunities they’re looking for.

To find out more go and create a free account and have a look around. Inside you’ll find tools to:

  • Create a profile where you can add brands, properties and deals you’ve done
  • Review the latest sponsorship news
  • Sort and search through a stack of sponsorship data, which can be filtered by specific criteria (categories, deal histories, activation markets etc.)
  • Sort and search through available properties, which can also be filtered by specific criteria (demographic data, genre, location etc.)
  • Get a listing of available jobs in the sponsorship industry
  • Access a directory of members and their contact details

What are the potential advantages for the small time sponsorship seeker?

I know how much time I spend finding and researching potential sponsors via the web and other tools. It can be a full time job in itself.

What services like sponsorpitch.com provide is access to sponsorship data and market intelligence that could cost thousands of dollars and take many hours to collect, which in turn helps you avoid cookie-cutter proposals and provides real and unique value to potential sponsors.

It comes down to how much is your time worth and is a service like this valuable to you? I know that if there was more in the way of data related to the Australian market then I’d be on-board in a flash. One of the major hurdles to getting sponsored is finding those top 10 opportunities to focus your efforts on.

Happy sponsorship seeking… Cheers, Kym.

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